Wednesday, July 27, 2005

Take Criticism in Your Stride Using These 5 Proven Techniques

No matter how tough you appear on the outside, dealing with
criticism is hard. If you’re the victim of a harsh critique,
whether justified or not, here are five ways to keep your cool
and diffuse what could spiral into a heated situation!

1. One of the toughest kinds of criticisms to handle is an unjust
accusation. Even though it’s tempting, don’t stage a comeback
with equally defensive, biting or embarrassing personal remarks.
The accuser may have just been misinformed. Instead, ask the
criticizer questions and probe into their comments. Often, there
is some underlying cause for their accusation. If it’s truly
unjust, you’ll be able to mend the problem and state the facts
right there on the spot.

2. If you immediately assume the defense, your critic will feel
as if their message just hit a brick wall, and they’ll keep
trying to insist and focus on the problem. By listening
constructively, you’ll indicate that you’ve heard their criticism
and that you intend to follow up on the problem. Even better,
ask the critic what THEY would do differently if they were in
your situation. Chances are, you’ll get a lot of feedback and
perhaps some solid ideas and suggestions as well.

3. If the discussion becomes heated, lower your voice for every
level your critic raises theirs. This shows not only that you’re
calm and collected (even if your blood is boiling underneath),
but puts the spotlight on the other person, embarrassing them to
some degree because they were unable to maintain a reasonable
tone and temper.

4. Show that you’re more interested in solving the problem than
arguing for your point of view. Sometimes, an honest critique
can be a delicate way of informing you of a particular problem
that no one else notices or wants to share. Don’t be too quick
to defend yourself or judge your accuser, and take the complaints
and suggestions in stride. Chances are, it will give you some
insights into improvements you can make that you ordinarily may
have overlooked or not even considered.

5. If the issues begin to get out of hand, and you feel yourself
starting to lose your cool, take a deep breath to gather your
thoughts and ask your accuser for specific details and points
that led them to bring this item to your attention. You may
uncover the heart of the real matter and the real reason for
their biting remarks, and it may even be something totally
unrelated to the matter at hand!

Remember though, you can’t please all the people all the time.
Some people are simply never satisfied. Overlook these
shortsighted individuals and know deep down that you are making
positive progress despite their attempts to drag you down. When
you know that you’ve done your best, the bitter pill of criticism
will feel more like a hearty dose of good medicine, and that
makes all kinds of criticism easier to take.

Roger Clark is senior editor at Top Career Resumes and Career Information Resources who provide free information to job seekers on all aspects of finding a new job and Top USA jobs where you can find the most up-to-date advice and salary information for jobs in all states.

Tuesday, July 26, 2005

Launch of New Partner Site

I am pleased to announced the launch of Top USA Jobs, a partner site to Top Career Resumes and Career Information Resources. Your news center for everything about jobs in the USA ... salary data for top paying occupations in every state in as well as detailed job descriptions, experience and knowledge requirements.

For a sample of the type of articles you can expect in the future, take a look at this article on trials and tribulations of a typical job seeker ...

Another morning of job hunting lies ahead of you. You pour a cup of coffee and open the paper to the employment section. With a mixture of anticipation and desperation you pick up a stub of pencil and prepare to target and identify some possible job
opportunities.

There are less ads to circle this morning and despite the promising words and vague descriptions you have begun to believe that none of these potential employers will seriously consider you. Perhaps they have family or friends or maybe you'll hear
once again "I'm afraid you're overqualified for this position".

After making a few phone calls you try to get into a positive frame of mind. You head out the door, a folder of resumes in one hand and a list of addresses at the next. You will drop off a few resumes and have plans for an interview this afternoon.

Maybe today will be different...

Are you or a friend looking for work? Have you heard of acquaintances laid off from long-term employment only to find four or five months later that they are still unable to find a job?

If you think the only way to find a job is to have connections, you may be partly right. With such a demand for employment many jobs never make it to the paper. How can you compete?

NETWORKING

"Leave no stone unturned". Tell friends, family and acquaintances of your job search. These people can give you an 'IN' to their businesses when positions come available.

They may also hear of someone who is hiring and keep you updated on opportunities you may not otherwise have heard about. Their personal referral can also make an impression on the employer in your behalf.

NON-POSTED JOBS

You don't have to wait for a job to be listed in the paper, or even posted on the company board, to apply for work at a company.


Go through the phone book and make a list of companies you'd like to work for. Call and ask if there are any positions available. Ask for the name of the human resources manager or the individual in charge of hiring for the area you are applying to.

Send a resume and direct it to the person in charge of hiring.

Write a cover letter that expresses your interest in the company and why you'd like to work for them. Follow up several days later and ask for the individual. Tell them you're checking to see that they received your resume and ask if there are any positions that may become available.

If they are not hiring suggest you'll check back at another time. Often positions are made available unexpectedly and by keeping in contact (without pestering) you may be the first person that comes to mind.

This is not a secret. If you're not taking advantage, someone else will. You can't afford to miss out on making yourself known to employers BEFORE the job posting is made public.

Accessing this hidden job market may open up opportunities you never thought possible. By staying one step ahead of other job searchers you can be sure that your new job is just around the corner!

I hope you found the above article to be of interest.

Please find below a listing of all the pages currently available on Top USA Jobs ...

Kind Regards


Roger Clark
(Senior Editor)

Top USA Jobs

Top USA Jobs News Blog



alabama jobs
alabama salaries
alaska jobs
alaska salaries
arizona jobs
arizona salaries
arkansas jobs
arkansas salaries
california jobs
california salaries
colorado jobs
colorado salaries
connecticut jobs
connecticut salaries
delaware jobs
delaware salaries
district_of_columbia jobs
district_of_columbia salaries
florida jobs
florida salaries
georgia jobs
georgia salaries
guam jobs
guam salaries
hawaii jobs
hawaii salaries
idaho jobs
idaho salaries
illinois jobs
illinois salaries
indiana jobs
indiana salaries
iowa jobs
iowa salaries
kansas jobs
kansas salaries
kentucky jobs
kentucky salaries
louisiana jobs
louisiana salaries
maine jobs
maine salaries
maryland jobs
maryland salaries
massachusetts jobs
massachusetts salaries
michigan jobs
michigan salaries
minnesota jobs
minnesota salaries
mississippi jobs
mississippi salaries
missouri jobs
missouri salaries
montana jobs
montana salaries
nebraska jobs
nebraska salaries
nevada jobs
nevada salaries
new_hampshire jobs
new_hampshire salaries
new_jersey jobs
new_jersey salaries
new_mexico jobs
new_mexico salaries
new_york jobs
new_york salaries
north_carolina jobs
north_carolina salaries
north_dakota jobs
north_dakota salaries
ohio jobs
ohio salaries
oklahoma jobs
oklahoma salaries
oregon jobs
oregon salaries
pennsylvania jobs
pennsylvania salaries
puerto_rico jobs
puerto_rico salaries
rhode_island jobs
rhode_island salaries
south_carolina jobs
south_carolina salaries
south_dakota jobs
south_dakota salaries
tennessee jobs
tennessee salaries
texas jobs
texas salaries
utah jobs
utah salaries
vermont jobs
vermont salaries
virgin_islands jobs
virgin_islands salaries
virginia jobs
virginia salaries
washington jobs
washington salaries
west_virginia jobs
west_virginia salaries
wisconsin jobs
wisconsin salaries
wyoming jobs
wyoming salaries

Thursday, July 21, 2005

Top Career Advice ... More Choices and A Better Way of Life

Why Career Advice Is So Important

Choosing a career presents a nerve-racking decision, as it can have a life-long impact on you. Do not fret, as you can gain a clearer outlook into your future by thorough career planning.

Having a clear vision of the future can guide you by helping you set career goals and helping you on your way towards attaining them. Whether you are starting out on a new career or looking to change your current career, you will benefit enormously from taking sound advice.

Don't Spend Most of Your Life Doing ...

Chances are that you will be spending a great deal of time at your job, about 40 hours a week. Career advice and career profiling can guide you to a job that is enjoyable for you and matches your interests.

There are many reasons people change their careers and career advice can help them along the way. Some frequently cited reasons are:

· Stuck in a dead end job.

· Lost interest in current line of work.

· Gained a new interest in a different career option.

A Job For Life ... Not Anymore

In today’s world, there is increased job rotation ... also with the down turns in the economy, many people can be laid-off.
Good career advice for unemployed persons would be to consider a career change. Some of the fastest growing occupations are Medical Assistant, Network Systems Analyst, Physician Assistant, etc. Occupations that are struggling to gain workers can be a suitable option for currently unemployed individuals.

People often back off from changing careers if they are unsure of the effort it might take to start a new career and learn a new trade. If you are one of these people, career advice from professionals can help you make a knowledgeable decision.

How To Identify Your Career Choices

When choosing a new career field, career advice and career planning can help you figure out your career choices. When embarking on a new career, you need to take into account your previous education and work experience.

You should start thinking about the skills you currently possess and how they can be beneficial in each of the new career options available to you.

Have You Considered a Career Test?

Valuable career advice can come from career tests as they can help in identifying suitable job options. Career tests include tests such as personality profiling, leadership skills, motivation, management style, etc.

The results of such tests can give you the career advice that can direct you to a suitable career, by matching your interests with career options.

Many career tests are offered online. They may be free or available for a small fee. Many experts provide the career advice to employment seekers to take some time to plan their career and set their goals. Knowing your career goals can provide you with valuable guidance.

Remember that career planning and goal setting is an on-going process, changing as you continue on your career.

The web can be a great source to find valuable career advice. It can provide you with many resources to research new career choices and find out information on a particular career field such as average salary, work environment, job responsibilities, etc.

Use Resumes That Give You an Advantage

Whether you are starting a career, changing careers or looking for a different job in your present career, the best career advice is to have a great, eye-catching resume.

You may be thinking about using your old resume, maybe the one you made after graduating from college. However, you will have to make changes to that resume to make it relevant to your present situation.

Upgrade your resume with the additional skills and experiences you have acquired. People going through a career change, need to present the skills they have acquired through the years in a way that makes it relevant to the new career jobs for which they are applying.

You may not have all the standard education for that career, so you need to convince potential employers that your previous education and work experience have given you the skills that make you a suitable candidate to transition into that job.

Career planning involves gaining information that can ease your transition to a new career. This information can help get you out of your current dreary jobs and into a dynamic and interesting career.

Act Now... and Take Control of Your Career

It's never too late to think of making a career change... seek professional career advice and give yourself the best chance of achieving your career goals.

Roger Clark (BSc) has over 25 years experience in career development & recruitment at a senior level through top management positions he has held with major international companies.

You can visit his "Top Career Resumes" website or "Career Information Resources" website for a wealth of top quality information relating to the employment market.

Thursday, July 14, 2005

How NOT to Ask For a Salary Increase and Get Your Raise

Feeling overworked and underpaid? If you’re starting to feel like you deserve a raise, here are four DON’Ts to avoid in asking for the salary you feel you deserve.

DON’T

1. Raise your tone of voice if your boss objects to your raise at first. Remember, he or she is paying you to do a certain job, and you’re asking for more money to do the same job. Be professional and polite at all times, and listen more than demand.

Chances are, if your supervisor doesn’t award you a raise, they might hint at what could else could be done to earn it. If they don’t, don’t be afraid to ask what steps would be necessary to “prove yourself”.

2. Threaten with quitting if you don’t get the raise or telling your boss you have another job offer unless you actually do. He may just call your bluff and let you go!

3. Stumble or beat around the bush with your request. Be straightforward and confident. You are a valuable member of a team and the supervisor hired you because they obviously thought you were the best qualified. If you have “Thank You” notes from customers or letters from the company praising you for a job well done, bring those to your meeting as well, as they’ll help to cement your request and remind your supervisor of your role within the company and its progress.

4. Compare yourself to, or talk negatively about your coworkers or others in a position higher than you. You may think that this will put you in a positive light when it comes to a promotion or a raise, but to your boss, it shows that if you have a poor attitude toward your colleagues, you’ll keep the same poor attitude if you are promoted.

Remember, be confident, professional and tactful. If the boss says “no” or wants to “think about it”, open his mind to further consideration by volunteering to do more at the office. Stay an extra hour or help another team on a critical project. This demonstrates that you’re willing to “tow the mark” rather than giving your boss the impression of “gimme the money first and THEN I’ll work”. Good luck!

Roger Clark is senior editor at Top Career Resumes and Career Information Resources who provide free information to job seekers on all aspects of finding a new job and Medical Health News where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on many medical, health and lifestyle topics.

Please have a look at these useful pages ...

Career Information Resources


Career Occupation Description
Aptitude Tests
Career Tests
Career Resources Blog
Career Development Techniques
Career News Letter
Career Salaries
Career Site Map
All In One Study Guides

Tuesday, July 12, 2005

Tips on How to Write High Impact Letters of Recommendation

Congratulations. You’ve been asked to write a letter of
recommendation for an employee or colleague. This person values
your opinion of him or her, and you’d be glad to help them
advance. The problem is you’re unsure of what to say or how to
say it! Here are four tips to keep in mind when preparing your
recommendation.

1. Ask the employee about the new position they are applying for.
What types of job duties are involved? What sort of
characteristics are they looking for in a good employee? In your
letter, describe certain instances where this employee or
colleague really shined - such as staying late to complete a
mission-critical project, working diligently to help a customer
make a product decision, providing thorough technical support or
service, and so on. These specific situations have more effect
on the person doing the hiring than general run-of-the-mill
phrases like "terrific manager", "enthusiastic worker" and so
on.

2. Use powerful statements that really show your depth of
knowledge about the person. A description like "X is a keen
observer who knows how to make customers act and is there with
them every step of the way if they are hesitant or have
questions" gives a true, in-depth knowledge of the person in a
way that a casual letter may not.

3. Print off five letters of reference on company stationery and
give them to the recipient. This gives your colleague or
coworker additional letters for any other positions that he or
she may be applying for in the future, and saves you from having
to write them if the request comes around again! If you know it,
put the address of the company to whom the letter is being sent,
as well as the name of the person in Human Resources who will be
collecting and organizing these reference letters. A
personalized greeting is far better than a general "To Whom It
May Concern" salutation. For the other four copies, leave the
address area blank so that the employee can use them for other
job opportunities that arise.

4. If you’re really stuck on what to write, or simply don’t have
time, ask the person requesting the reference to write a letter
about themselves in their own words and you’ll sign it for them.
This is a great time-saver and a perfect idea if you’re
struggling to put the right words on paper.

If you keep these four tips in mind, writing a letter of
recommendation will not only come easier to you, but it will let
the person receiving the letter know how much you value them as
an employee or colleague, and will help them feel more confident
when they move on to the next step - the interview. Good
luck!

Roger Clark is senior editor at Top Career Resumes and Career Information Resources who provide free information to job seekers on all aspects of finding a new job and Medical Health News where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on many medical, health and lifestyle topics.

This career news blog contains links to all of the latest pages forming part of the Career Information Resources site:

Career Information Resources

Career Occupation Description
Aptitude Tests
Career Tests
Career Resources Blog
Career Development Techniques
Career News Letter
Career Thank You
Free Gift
Career Salaries
Career Site Map
All In One Study Guides
Top Career Resources

Abilities Aptitude Tests
Accountants Aptitude Tests
Accounting Aptitude Tests
Admission Aptitude Tests
Agricultural Aptitude Tests
Air Traffic Aptitude Tests
Animal Trainers Aptitude Tests
Answers To Aptitude Tests
Architects Aptitude Tests
Armed Forces Aptitude Tests
Armed Services Aptitude Tests
Art Aptitude Tests
ASVAB Aptitude Tests
Attorneys Aptitude Tests
Authors Aptitude Tests
Automotive Mechanics Aptitude Tests
Aviation Aptitude Tests
Banking Aptitude Tests
Bank Tellers Aptitude Tests
Barber Aptitude Tests
Barrons Aptitude Tests
Bartenders Aptitude Tests
Beauticians Aptitude Tests
Call Center Aptitude Tests
Career Aptitude Tests
Casino Aptitude Tests
Catering Aptitude Tests
Chefs Aptitude Tests
Chemists Aptitude Tests
Child Care Aptitude Tests
Chiropractors Aptitude Tests
Circus Aptitude Tests
Clergy Aptitude Tests
Clerical Aptitude Tests
College Aptitude Tests
Computer Aptitude Tests
Construction Aptitude Tests
Consulting Aptitude Tests
Cosmetics Aptitude Tests
Cruise Ships Aptitude Tests
Customer Service Aptitude Tests
Dental Aptitude Tests
Detroit Aptitude Tests
Dieticians Aptitude Tests
Differential Aptitude Tests
Divers Aptitude Tests
Doctors Aptitude Tests
Dog Trainer Aptitude Tests
Drivers Aptitude Tests
Electricians Aptitude Tests
Employment Aptitude Tests
Engineers Aptitude Tests
English Aptitude Tests
Entertainers Aptitude Tests
Entrance Aptitude Tests
Farmers Aptitude Tests
Farriers Aptitude Tests
Fashion Designers Aptitude Tests
Film Director Aptitude Tests
Film Producer Aptitude Tests
Financial Services Aptitude Tests
Firefighters Aptitude Tests
Food Services Aptitude Tests
Free Aptitude Tests
Funeral Directors Aptitude Tests
General Aptitude Tests
Graduate Aptitude Tests
Graphic Designers Aptitude Tests
Gynecologist Aptitude Tests
Hair Dresser Aptitude Tests
Hair Stylist Aptitude Tests
Help Desk Aptitude Tests
Hospitality Aptitude Tests
Hotel Management Aptitude Tests
Human Resources Aptitude Tests
Insurance Aptitude Tests
Interior Designers Aptitude Tests
IT Aptitude Tests
Janitors Aptitude Tests
Jockeys Aptitude Tests
Journalists Aptitude Tests
Landscape Gardeners Aptitude Tests
Language Aptitude Tests
Law Enforcement Aptitude Tests
Lawyers Aptitude Tests
Learning Aptitude Tests
Legal Aptitude Tests
Librarians Aptitude Tests
Manufacturing Aptitude Tests
Marine Aptitude Tests
Market Research Aptitude Tests
Masseurs Aptitude Tests
Mechanical Aptitude Tests
Medical Aptitude Tests
Military Aptitude Tests
Miners Aptitude Tests
Mortgage Aptitude Tests
Morticians Aptitude Tests
Music Aptitude Tests
NMSQT Aptitude Tests
Nurses Aptitude Tests
Nursing Aptitude Tests
Nutritionists Aptitude Tests
Opticians Aptitude Tests
Painters Aptitude Tests
Paramedics Aptitude Tests
Pass Aptitude Tests
Pediatrician Aptitude Tests
Personality Aptitude Tests
Pharmacists Aptitude Tests
Photographers Aptitude Tests
Physicians Aptitude Tests
Physiotherapists Aptitude Tests
Plumbers Aptitude Tests
Police Aptitude Tests
Policeman Aptitude Tests
Postal services Aptitude Tests
Practice Aptitude Tests
Prepare For Aptitude Tests
Programmer Aptitude Tests
PSAT Aptitude Tests
Psychological Aptitude Tests
Purchase Agents Aptitude Tests
Quality Controllers Aptitude Tests
Questions For Aptitude Tests
Reading Aptitude Tests
Real Estate Aptitude Tests
Realtors Aptitude Tests
Reporters Aptitude Tests
Sales Aptitude Tests
Salesman Aptitude Tests
Scholastic Aptitude Tests
Scores For Aptitude Tests
Secretary Aptitude Tests
Security Guards Aptitude Tests
Selection Aptitude Tests
Social Services Aptitude Tests
Spatial Aptitude Tests
Sports Aptitude Tests
Stock Brokers Aptitude Tests
Student Aptitude Tests
Study Guide Aptitude Tests
Surgeons Aptitude Tests
Teachers Aptitude Tests
Teaching Aptitude Tests
Tips For Aptitude Tests
Travel Agents Aptitude Tests
Trichology Aptitude Tests
Truck Drivers Aptitude Tests
TV Repairs Aptitude Tests
verbal Aptitude Tests
Veterinary Aptitude Tests
Vocational Aptitude Tests
Warehousing Aptitude Tests
Writers Aptitude Tests

Monday, July 11, 2005

Job Search Advice for Desperate Job Seekers

Welcome to the launch of Career Information Resources ... a site dedicated to providing unique and powerful career advice on aptitude testing, career development, study guides and salaries. Everything you need to know making your career choices and finding your ideal job.

Our first article provides some sound advice for desperate job seekers ...

Another morning of job hunting lies ahead of you. You pour a cup of coffee and open the paper to the employment section. With a mixture of anticipation and desperation you pick up a stub of pencil and prepare to target and identify some possible job opportunities.

There are less ads to circle this morning and despite the promising words and vague descriptions you have begun to believe that none of these potential employers will seriously consider you. Perhaps they have family or friends or aybe you'll hear once again "I'm afraid you're overqualified for this position".

After making a few phone calls you try to get into a positive frame of mind. You head out the door, a folder of resumes in one hand and a list of addresses at the next. You will drop off a few resumes and have plans for an interview this afternoon.

Maybe today will be different...

Are you or a friend looking for work? Have you heard of acquaintances laid off from long-term employment only to find
four or five months later that they are still unable to find a job?

If you think the only way to find a job is to have connections, you may be partly right. With such a demand for employment many jobs never make it to the paper. How can you compete?

NETWORKING

"Leave no stone unturned". Tell friends, family and acquaintances of your job search. These people can give you an 'IN' to their businesses when positions come available. They may also hear of someone who is hiring and keep you updated on opportunities you may not otherwise have heard about. Their personal referral can also make an impression on the employer in your behalf.

NON-POSTED JOBS

You don't have to wait for a job to be listed in the paper, or even posted on the company board, to apply for work at a company. Go through the phone book and make a list of companies you'd like to work for. Call and ask if there are any positions available. Ask for the name of the human resources manager or the individual in charge of hiring for the area you are applying to.

Send a resume and direct it to the person in charge of hiring. Write a cover letter that expresses your interest in the company and why you'd like to work for them. Follow up several days later and ask for the individual. Tell them you're checking to see that they received your resume and ask if there are any positions that may become available.

If they are not hiring suggest you'll check back at another time. Often positions are made available unexpectedly and by keeping in contact (without pestering) you may be the first person that comes to mind.

This is not a secret. If you're not taking advantage, someone else will. You can't afford to miss out on making yourself known to employers BEFORE the job posting is made public. Accessing this hidden job market may open up opportunities you never thought possible. By staying one step ahead of other job searchers you can be sure that your new job is just around the corner!

Roger Clark is senior editor at Top Career Resumes who provide free information to job seekers on all aspects of finding a new job and Medical Health News where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on many medical, health and lifestyle topics.


Please take a look at the following pages that are available on this site ...

This career news blog contains links to all of the latest pages forming part of the Career Information Resources site:

Career Information Resources

Career Occupation Description
Aptitude Tests
Career Tests
Career Resources Blog
Career Development Techniques
Career News Letter
Career Thank You
Free Gift
Career Salaries
Career Site Map
All In One Study Guides
Top Career Resources

Abilities Aptitude Tests
Accountants Aptitude Tests
Accounting Aptitude Tests
Admission Aptitude Tests
Agricultural Aptitude Tests
Air Traffic Aptitude Tests
Animal Trainers Aptitude Tests
Answers To Aptitude Tests
Architects Aptitude Tests
Armed Forces Aptitude Tests
Armed Services Aptitude Tests
Art Aptitude Tests
ASVAB Aptitude Tests
Attorneys Aptitude Tests
Authors Aptitude Tests
Automotive Mechanics Aptitude Tests
Aviation Aptitude Tests
Banking Aptitude Tests
Bank Tellers Aptitude Tests
Barber Aptitude Tests
Barrons Aptitude Tests
Bartenders Aptitude Tests
Beauticians Aptitude Tests
Call Center Aptitude Tests
Career Aptitude Tests
Casino Aptitude Tests
Catering Aptitude Tests
Chefs Aptitude Tests
Chemists Aptitude Tests
Child Care Aptitude Tests
Chiropractors Aptitude Tests
Circus Aptitude Tests
Clergy Aptitude Tests
Clerical Aptitude Tests
College Aptitude Tests
Computer Aptitude Tests
Construction Aptitude Tests
Consulting Aptitude Tests
Cosmetics Aptitude Tests
Cruise Ships Aptitude Tests
Customer Service Aptitude Tests
Dental Aptitude Tests
Detroit Aptitude Tests
Dieticians Aptitude Tests
Differential Aptitude Tests
Divers Aptitude Tests
Doctors Aptitude Tests
Dog Trainer Aptitude Tests
Drivers Aptitude Tests
Electricians Aptitude Tests
Employment Aptitude Tests
Engineers Aptitude Tests
English Aptitude Tests
Entertainers Aptitude Tests
Entrance Aptitude Tests
Farmers Aptitude Tests
Farriers Aptitude Tests
Fashion Designers Aptitude Tests
Film Director Aptitude Tests
Film Producer Aptitude Tests
Financial Services Aptitude Tests
Firefighters Aptitude Tests
Food Services Aptitude Tests
Free Aptitude Tests
Funeral Directors Aptitude Tests
General Aptitude Tests
Graduate Aptitude Tests
Graphic Designers Aptitude Tests
Gynecologist Aptitude Tests
Hair Dresser Aptitude Tests
Hair Stylist Aptitude Tests
Help Desk Aptitude Tests
Hospitality Aptitude Tests
Hotel Management Aptitude Tests
Human Resources Aptitude Tests
Insurance Aptitude Tests
Interior Designers Aptitude Tests
IT Aptitude Tests
Janitors Aptitude Tests
Jockeys Aptitude Tests
Journalists Aptitude Tests
Landscape Gardeners Aptitude Tests
Language Aptitude Tests
Law Enforcement Aptitude Tests
Lawyers Aptitude Tests
Learning Aptitude Tests
Legal Aptitude Tests
Librarians Aptitude Tests
Manufacturing Aptitude Tests
Marine Aptitude Tests
Market Research Aptitude Tests
Masseurs Aptitude Tests
Mechanical Aptitude Tests
Medical Aptitude Tests
Military Aptitude Tests
Miners Aptitude Tests
Mortgage Aptitude Tests
Morticians Aptitude Tests
Music Aptitude Tests
NMSQT Aptitude Tests
Nurses Aptitude Tests
Nursing Aptitude Tests
Nutritionists Aptitude Tests
Opticians Aptitude Tests
Painters Aptitude Tests
Paramedics Aptitude Tests
Pass Aptitude Tests
Pediatrician Aptitude Tests
Personality Aptitude Tests
Pharmacists Aptitude Tests
Photographers Aptitude Tests
Physicians Aptitude Tests
Physiotherapists Aptitude Tests
Plumbers Aptitude Tests
Police Aptitude Tests
Policeman Aptitude Tests
Postal services Aptitude Tests
Practice Aptitude Tests
Prepare For Aptitude Tests
Programmer Aptitude Tests
PSAT Aptitude Tests
Psychological Aptitude Tests
Purchase Agents Aptitude Tests
Quality Controllers Aptitude Tests
Questions For Aptitude Tests
Reading Aptitude Tests
Real Estate Aptitude Tests
Realtors Aptitude Tests
Reporters Aptitude Tests
Sales Aptitude Tests
Salesman Aptitude Tests
Scholastic Aptitude Tests
Scores For Aptitude Tests
Secretary Aptitude Tests
Security Guards Aptitude Tests
Selection Aptitude Tests
Social Services Aptitude Tests
Spatial Aptitude Tests
Sports Aptitude Tests
Stock Brokers Aptitude Tests
Student Aptitude Tests
Study Guide Aptitude Tests
Surgeons Aptitude Tests
Teachers Aptitude Tests
Teaching Aptitude Tests
Tips For Aptitude Tests
Travel Agents Aptitude Tests
Trichology Aptitude Tests
Truck Drivers Aptitude Tests
TV Repairs Aptitude Tests
verbal Aptitude Tests
Veterinary Aptitude Tests
Vocational Aptitude Tests
Warehousing Aptitude Tests
Writers Aptitude Tests

Saturday, July 09, 2005

What You Should Never Put on Your Resume

Liars Get Caught! What NOT to Put on Your Resume

"Everybody does it" as they say. Face it, the job market can be a very tough place to compete. If everyone inflates their experience then how can an honest person get a job?

Well, as tempting as it may be, you do NOT want to risk lying on your resume.

Whether it's personal information, job experience, or schooling - employers are finding new ways to sniff out liars and you don't want to be one of them.

PERSONAL INFORMATION

While some information may not be easily verified, information such as a criminal record, can be very costly to you in the event it is checked out. With sites like rapsheets.com you can never guarantee that an employer won't be able to find the information, even if your employer is hiring you for domestic work and is not a business.

JOB EXPERIENCE

Clearly this is not the place to boast about fake employment as you are going to list the businesses you worked for which may be contacted for verification. As this is the most likely area your interviewer will do a check on, avoid misrepresenting yourself at all costs.

EDUCATION

Think that nobody will notice if you slip in an education you don't really have? Perhaps you do have the skills, but you can't afford to claim education you can't provide proof of. EmployAct.com is a new service that will allow employers to have background checks - similar to criminal or credit checks - to verify your claim.

WHAT YOU SHOULD HAVE

With all that said and done, how can you create a resume that will highlight your skills and abilities without needing to lie?

Give yourself credit. Your skills in the workforce can be weighty indicators of your ability to work in a given job. You may not know what an employer is looking for. With many jobs that don't require a particular expertise, you many find that they are looking for people who are able to learn on the job. Proof that you have gained skills as a worker (or even a volunteer if you're just starting out) can be very valuable.

Be certain that you focus on skills. Expand your descriptions. Do not say 'I worked in an office', rather say 'I was responsible for answering the phones in a professional manner and directing calls to the proper departments. In a busy work environment I was able to multi-task by providing supportive administrative assistance to the head receptionist including maintaining a filing system, processing inter office memos, delivering documents in a timely manner, directing clients to their meeting appointments and providing relief reception. I was quickly able to learn the filing and switchboard systems as well as create good working relationships with fellow staff.'

As you can see from the above example, it is perfectly acceptable to elaborate on your skills, but do so in an honest and ethical manner. If you need help you can find software programs which will give you suggestions on wording depending on the position you are describing or you can hire someone who writes resumes to help you. Have confidence in keeping the job you are sure to get by doing it right the first time.

Roger Clark is senior editor at Top Career Resumes who provide free information to job seekers on all aspects of finding a new job and Medical Health News where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on many medical, health and lifestyle topics.